English Exam

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Last updated: December 3, 2019

Puck
Oberon’s right hand fairy; creates mischief; Robin Goodfellow

Oberon
King of the Fairies. Jealous of Titania because he wants the changeling boy.

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Titania
The queen of the fairies, Resists the attempts of her husband, Oberon, to get the changeling boy for his own use. Falls in love with Bottom because of a love potion.

Nick Bottom
overconfident, a weaver, plays Pyramus in the play, head turned into an donkey’s by Puck

Hermia
Daughter of Egeus; in love with Lysander; best friend of Helena

Lysander
In love with Hermia, but enchanted to fall in love with Helena

Helena
Loves Demetrius. Hermia’s best friend. Follows Lysander and Hermia into the forest.

Demetrius
Egeus wants him to wed Hermia, loved by Helena, falls in love with Helena under a spell

Egeus
Father of Hermia; doesn’t want her to marry Lysander, prefers Demetrius

Peter Quince
A carpenter and leader of the Mechanicals attempt to put a play on for Theseus’s marriage

Francis Flute
Bellows-mender, plays Thisbe

Robin Starveling
Tailor, plays Thisbe’s mother

Tom Snout
Tinker, plays Pyramus’s father

Snug
Joiner, plays the lion

Hippolyta
Queen of the Amazons, betrothed to Theseus

Philostrate
Master of the revels to Theseus

Titania’s Fairies
Peaseblossom, Mustardseed, Moth, Cobweb

Abstruse
Adjective, difficult to comprehend (due to extreme complexity); intellectually demanding; highly abstract; “deep”.

Acquiescent
Adjective. Willing to carry out the orders or wishers of another without protect; easily giving in to the wishes of another.

Acquiesce
Verb. To submit to simply silently or without protest; to give in or yield.

Apex
Noun. The highest point or peak (of a place; of excitement); summit.

Buttress
Verb. To support or reinforce something.

Buttress
Noun.

A structure, generally of brick or stone, built against a wall to reinforce.

Capricious
Adjective. Characterize by or subject to whim; impulsive and unpredictable.

Cogitate
Verb. To think deeply and carefully about something; to ponder.

Conciliatory
Adjective.

Used or meant to make peace; done to appease someone who is upset.

Dexterous
Adjective. Physically skillful; agile.

Ephemeral
Adjective.

Lasting for only a short period of time; fleeting.

Euphonious
Adjective. Pleasing or agreeable to the ear; sonorous.

Expunge
Verb.

To get rid of something completely; to erase.

Gregarious
Adjective. Very friendly or sociable.

Harbinger
Noun. One that indicates or foreshadows what is to come; a forerunner.

Irascible
Adjective. Prone to outbursts of temper; easily angered.

Juxtapose
Verb.

To place side by side, especially for comparison.

Magnanimous
Adjective. Courageously noble in mind and heart; generous in giving and forgiving.

Obdurate
Adjective. Not easily persuaded or influenced.

Perfunctory
Done routinely and with little interest or care; robotically performed.

Perfunctorily
Adverb. Automatically; unconsciously.

Salubrious
Adjective. Beneficial to or promoting health or well-being.

Supercilious
Adjective. Full of contempt and arrogance.

Taciturn
Adjective. Habitually uncommunicative or reserved in speech or manner.

Truncated
Adjective. Shortened by having a part cut off or removed.

Truncate
Verb. To cut short.

Vie
Verb. To strive or compete.

Viscous
Adjective. Having relatively high resistance to flow.

Aloof
Adj. Distant in sympathy or interest.

Amiable
Adj. Having a pleasant and friendly disposition.

Audacious
Adj. Daring; fearless; brazen; not restrained by a sense of shame.

Audacity
N. Shameless or brazen boldness; insolence.

Austerity
N. The quality of being strict or rigid; without luxury.

Beguile
V. To mislead; to influence by trickery, flattery, etc.

Bequeath
V. to leave to or pass on to, as in a will.

Beseech
V. To ask eagerly or earnestly; implore; entreat.

Disparage
V. To lower in esteem; to disrespect.

Dowager
N.

An elderly woman with honor and dignity; a widow with money or property.

Enamored
Adj. Filled with love and desire.

Feign
V. To make a false show of.

Gait
N. Way of walking or running; manner of moving on foot.

Idolatry
N. Excessive devotion to or reverence of someone or something.

Knave
N. A man of humble birth (rare); a dishonest, deceitful person.

Knavish
Adj. Tricky;characteristic of a knave.

Lamentable
Adj.

Unfortunate; distressing.

Lament
V. To feel or express sorrow or regret for; to mourn.

Mirth
N. Joyfulness; gaiety, especially when characterized by laughter.

Nuptial
Adj. Having to do with marriage or a wedding.

Nymph
N. A lovely young woman, often depicted as a minor nature goddess.

Promontory
N.

A peak of high land that juts out into a body of water.

Relent
V. To become less severe or stubborn; to give in.

Revelry
N.

Noisy reveling; boisterous festivity.

Vile
Adj. Disgusting; offensive to the senses; inferior; morally low.

Visage
N. The face, with reference to the form, features, or expression; countenance.

Wanton
Adj. Immoral

Alliteration
The repetition of first sounds in two or more words used close together.

Allusion
A reference to a weel-known historical, literary, or biblical figure or item.

Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds withing words in a line of poetry.

Consonance
The repetition of consonant sounds within words in a line of poetry.

Genre
A category of artistic composition, as in music or literature, marked by a distinctive style, form, or content.

Literary Geres include short story, novel, poem, play, essay, etc.

Hyperbole
A deliberate exaggeration or overstatment used for emphasis or effect.

Iambic Pentameter
A series of ten beats or syllables (five iambs) creating a rhythamic phrase in poetry.

Idiom
A use of words, grammatical construction, or expression that cannot be translated literally into a second language.

Imagery
The use of words or phrases that create a picture in reader’s mind.

Irony
A difference between expectation and reality.

Lyric Poetry
Pietry that focuses on expressing emotions or thoughts, rather than ontelling a story.

Metaphor
A comparision between two unlike things.

Narrative Poetry
Poetry that tells a story.

This type of poetry may or may not use dialogue.

Onomatopoeia
The use of a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning.

Oxymoron
Two contradictory terms that are used together.

Personification
The act of giving human characteristics to something that is not human.

Rhyme Scheme
The pattern of phyme in a poem or song. The rhyme scheme is written using letter after each rhyming line.

Simile
A comparision between two unlike things using “like” or “as”.

Sonnet
A fourteen-line poem that has a rhyme scheme and follows a strict structure of ten bears per line.

Stanza
A grouping of two or mor lines of poetry in a poem. A stanza in poetry is like a paragraph in prose.

Speaker
The narrator of a poem.

Symbol
An object, action, or person which has meaning by itself yet means or suggests something else.

Tone
The author’s attitude toward the subject of a piece of literature.

Trite
Chiche, overused, commonplace, unoriginal.

Free Verse
Poetry that does not have a regular meter or rhyme scheme.

“Hate”
Tato Laviera

“Introduction to Poetry”
Billy Collins

“Metaphors”
Sylvia Plath

“Tattoo”
Gregg Shapiro

“Nature”
Longfellow

“Immigrant Picnic”
Gregory Djanikian

“Coconut”
Paul Hostovsky

Soliloquy
A speech given by a character alone on stage

Prose
Ordinary speech or writing without rhyme or meter; referring to speech or writing other than verse.

Poetry
Rhythmic, compressed language that uses figures of speech and imagery designed to appeal to our emotions and imagination.

1595
The year most people believe Shakespeare wrote AMSD.

Shakespeare’s Writings
Tragedies, Comedies, Histories, Romances, Sonnets, Long Poems.

Characteristics of Shakespeare’s Comedies
The plot moves from chaos to order, lovers are often disguised, the play ends in marriage, parental interference in love, etc.

Robin Goodfellow
Puck is also know as?

Lysander
“The course of true love never did run smooth” Who said this?

Love in Idleness
Potion Flower.

Pyramus and Thisbe
Play the Mechanicals perform.

Malapropism
The unintentional misuse of a word by confusion with one that sounds similar.

Haroun
Protagonist in the novel; has a crush on Blabbermouth; saves the Sea of Stories

Rashid
The father of the novel’s protagonist, Haroun, is a storyteller known by fans as the “Ocean of Notions” and by his enemies as the “Shah of Blah.”

Soraya
Left her husband for Mr. Sengupta; comes back at the end.

Mr. Sengupta
Haroun’s weedy, dreary, boring neighbor

Mrs. Oneeta Sengupta
Lives above Haroun’s family in the sad city. Her husband runs off with Haroun’s mother.

Mr. Butt
Provides transportation to Haroun and Rashid extremely quickly, ignoring all safety warnings

Butt the Hoopoe
Haroun chose him as a miniature creature, speaks without moving beak, brain later taken by Chupwalas.

Iff
A blue-bearded water genie from Earth’s invisible second moon, Kahani, sent by the Walrus to revoke in Rashid’s subscription to the Sea of Stories.

Helps Haroun later on.

Mali
Floating Gardener cares for the story streams in the Sea of Stories on Kahani. Doesn’t speak much.

Goopy and Bagha
Plentimaw fishes who always talk in rhymes, try to help Haroun on his journey.

Blabbermouth
A Page of the Library of Gup. Despises Princess Batcheat, and disguises herself as a boy, and is skilled at the art of juggling. Talks a lot.

Mudra
A “Shadow Warrior,” Second-in-command to Khattam-Shud, later joins forces with Rashid Khalifa and the Guppees.

Khattam-Shud
The villain of the story, whose name means “completely finished”. He represents silence. Shadow and person two separate beings.

Walrus
The Grand Comptroller of Gup, directs the Eggheads. Has a large mustache.

Snooty Buttoo
Hires Rashid to convince people to reelect him.

Prince Bolo
Slightly ridiculous; in love with Batcheat.

Princess Batcheat
Changed all of the stories to be about Prince Bolo; has an ugly nose and horrific singing voice.

Salman Rushdie
Author of Haroun and the Sea of Stories.

1990
The year Haroun and the Sea of Stories was published.

Fatwa
A legal ruling within Islam.

Shah
Title for the ruler of Iran.

Exile
Expelled from home or country by authority.

Ayatollah Khomeini
Shah of Iran at the time when Rushdie’s book the Satanic Verses came out.

Called Rushdie’s death sentence.

Alifbay
A country with a city so sad people have forgotten its name, miserable, black smoke everywhere.

Kahani
Earth’s second moon, driven by machines, so fast no instruments can detect it. Also the name of the city Haroun is from. A city that used to be so sad it didn’t know its own name.

Gup City
A city in eternal sunlight on the Earth’s second moon, Kahani.

Land of Chup
Land of perpetual darkness. Twilight Strip located here.

Dull Lake
In the Valley of K, in Moody Land.

Town of G
Where Rashid goes off to speak but fails to come up with a story.

Valley of K
Where Snooty Buttoo is running and wants Rashid to speak.

Ocean of the Streams of Story
Where all the stories are. Gups in charge of watching it.

Old Zone
Where the oldest stories reside; has gotten very tangled and weed-filled due to lack of attention; where the Shadow ship is.

Charactonym
A name given to a character that gives an insight into some element of his/her personality.

Hoopoe Bird
A bird with an orange crest on its head, a long beak, and black and white striped feathers and tail

Aubergine
Eggplant.

P2C2E
Process Too Complicated To Explain.

Eggheads
Bald, shiny, hairless heads, white coats of laboratory technicians, control the M2C2D in the P2C2E House.

“I am the Walrus”
Beatles song alluded to in HATSOS.

Exxon Valdez
Oil tanker that crashed in March 1989, considered largest U. S. oil spill, emptied 35,000 tons of oil into Prince William Sound.

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