Introduction to Literature of the Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism – Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism

Topic: EnvironmentNatural Disasters
Sample donated:
Last updated: May 2, 2019
Read the sentence from Life on the Mississippi. He raged and stormed so (he was crossing the river at the time) that I judge it made him blind, because he ran over the steering-oar of a trading-scow.

Based on the excerpt, which of the following traits most suggests this is a work of realism?A. It focuses heavily on the most popular trades of the time.B. It focuses heavily on how to handle and steer a steamboat.C.

Don't use plagiarized sources.
Get Your Custom Essay on "Introduction to Literature of the Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism – Civil War, Regionalism, and Realism..."
For You For Only $13.90/page!


Get custom paper

It focuses heavily on the difficult life of steamboat captains.D. It focuses heavily on the flaws inherent within all humans.

D. It focuses heavily on the flaws inherent within all humans.

What does the dialogue in the excerpt from Life on the Mississippi indicate about the characters?A.

They are very well-spoken and greatly enjoyed conversation.B. They are perpetually involved in conflicts of various kinds.C. They are residents of the South in a much earlier time.

D. They are wealthy and generally well educated.

C. They are residents of the South in a much earlier time.

Read the sentence from Life on the Mississippi. He was a nervous man, and he shuffled from one side of his wheel to the other as if the floor was hot.The imagery draws on the senses of: A. smell and touch.

B. sight and hearing.C. sight and touch.D. smell and hearing.

C. sight and touch.

Read the excerpt from Life on the Mississippi.The face of the water, in time, became a wonderful book—a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice.What does the imagery suggest about the narrator’s relationship with his environment?A. He is frightened by his surroundings.B. He is very knowledgeable of nature’s workings.

C. He admires nature, but he sometimes feels lonely.D. He considers his relationship with nature highly intimate.

D. He considers his relationship with nature highly intimate.

What element in the excerpt from Life on the Mississippi most suggests that it is a realist text?A. It has dialogue that is both witty and believable.B. It contains well-rounded and diverse characters.C. It concerns itself with the trials of a daily occupation.

D. It pays close attention to the physical details of a setting.

C. It concerns itself with the trials of a daily occupation.

Read the excerpt from Life on the Mississippi.About this time Mr. Bixby appeared on the scene.

Something like a minute later I was climbing the pilot-house steps with some of my clothes on and the rest in my arms. Mr. Bixby was close behind, commenting. Here was something fresh—this thing of getting up in the middle of the night to go to work. It was a detail in piloting that had never occurred to me at all. I knew that boats ran all night, but somehow I had never happened to reflect that somebody had to get up out of a warm bed to run them.

I began to fear that piloting was not quite so romantic as I had imagined it was; there was something very real and work-like about this new phase of it.How does the excerpt reflect the fact that this novel is a realist text?A. It employs a matter-of-fact tone commonly used within realist texts.

B. It depicts the loss of a romantic vision of working on a steamboat.C. It suggests that what follows will be grim and possibly depressing.D. It uses humor to describe a situation that is difficult for the narrator.

B.

It depicts the loss of a romantic vision of working on a steamboat.

Read the sentence from Life on the Mississippi.Something like a minute later I was climbing the pilot-house steps with some of my clothes on and the rest in my arms.The imagery suggests that Twain is:A. surprised to be starting work so early.

B. generally disorganized and unkempt.C.

often guilty of acting without forethought.D. completely disoriented and confused.

A. surprised to be starting work so early.

Read the excerpt from Life on the Mississippi.

‘I—I—don’t know.”You—you—don’t know?’ mimicking my drawling manner of speech. ‘What DO you know?’ ‘I—I—nothing, for certain.’What is the significance of Bixby mocking the narrator’s speech?A. It reflects his low opinion of the narrator’s intelligence and social standing.B. It shows his desire to make others feel inferior.

C. It suggests a deep insecurity within Bixby’s character.D. It illustrates Bixby’s wish that the narrator speak without a drawl.

A.

It reflects his low opinion of the narrator’s intelligence and social standing.

Read the sentence from Life on the Mississippi.The fainter and farther away the scowmen’s curses drifted, the higher Mr. Bixby lifted his voice and the weightier his adjectives grew.

What does the imagery suggest?A. It shows that Mr. Bixby enjoys arguing loudly.

B. It indicates the intensity and volume of the exchange.C. It demonstrates Mr.

Bixby’s strong faith in his own actions.D. It illustrates the difficulty of communication between riverboats.

B. It indicates the intensity and volume of the exchange.

In what way does Life on the Mississippi reflect the time period in which it takes place?A. It contains many ideas considered outdated in the present day.B.

It shows that Twain had the ambition typical of people of the 19th century.C. It reflects the work ethic many people held at the time the book was written.

D. It reminds us that riverboats were once seen as exotic and adventurous.

D. It reminds us that riverboats were once seen as exotic and adventurous.

Choose your subject

x

Hi!
I'm Jessica!

Don't know how to start your paper? Worry no more! Get professional writing assistance from me.

Click here