Literary Devices, Types of Writing, Figurative Language, Elements of Fiction

Topics: ArtSymbolism

Type:

Sample donated:

Last updated: April 23, 2019

symbolism
using something to represent an idea or something else

allusion
reference in a literary work to a noun or another work of literature

flashback
interruption of the chronological sequence of an earlier occurrence

foreshadowing
writer provides hints or clues that suggest or predict future events in a story

irony
contrast between what’s expected and what actually exists

situational irony
what one thinks will happen in a situation but doesn’t

verbal irony
one says something but means something totally different (SARCASM)

dramatic irony
audience/reader knows more than the character(s)

imagery
words or phrases that appeal to the 5 senses

satire
use of irony, sarcasm, ridicule, etc. to expose, denounce, or deride vice, folly, etc.

fiction
fake; not real

nonfiction
real

fantasy
make-believe

realistic fiction
could possibly happen

historical fiction
fictious details with some historical facts

drama
meant to be performed by actors in front of an audience

poetry
writing with flow, verse, or rhythm

science fiction
fiction dealing with science and/or technology

personification
giving an inanimate object human characteristics

simile
comparison using “like” or “as”

metaphor
comparison without using “like” or “as”

hyperbole
extreme exaggeration

narrator
one who tells the story

setting
time and place of the story

protagonist
the hero (good guy) who opposes the bad guy

antagonist
opposes the hero

round
well-developed and fully described

flat
few qualities and undeveloped

static
no significant change over time

dynamic
undergoes a significant change

characters
people or thing(s) the story is about

direct characterization
author directly describes characters; physically described

indirect characterization
author describes character through thoughts, dialogue, and dialogue

plot
main events that structure a story

exposition
characters, setting, mood, and conflict are introduced and set up

narrative hook/inciting incident
attention grabber

rising action
events leading to the climax

climax
turning point of story

falling action
events following climax and leading up to resolution

resolution
conflict is solved

theme
main message of story

conflict
problem of story

internal conflict
man vs self

external conflict
man vs natureman vs manman vs societyman vs technology

1st person
I, we, me, us

2nd person
you

3rd person limited omniscient
narrator is NOT a character; NOT all-knowing

3rd person omniscient
narrator is NOT a character; all-knowing

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