Norton Introduction to Literature, 11th Edition: Test Vocabulary

Topic: ArtConcerts
Sample donated:
Last updated: April 29, 2019
antagonist
A character or force in conflict with the main character

archetype
a character, ritual, symbol, or plot pattern that reoccurs in the literature of many cultures; ie. the trickster, the scapegoat, rite of passage, etc.

central consciousness
a character whose inner thoughts, perceptions, and feelings are revealed by a third-person limited narrator

deus ex machina
literally Latin for “god out of the machine,” it is any improbable, unprepared for plot changes introduced late in a literary work to resolve the conflict

plot
the arrangement of action

in media res
Latin for “in the middle of things,” referrers to the opening of a plot in the middle of the action

flashbacks
a plot device where a scene from the fictional past is inserted into the fictional present or future

episode
a distinct action or series of actions within a plot

flashforward
plot device where a scene from the fictional future is inserted into the fictional present

forshadowing
a hint or clue about what will happen at a later moment

subplot
a secondary plot in a work of literature

discriminated occasion
a specific, discrete moment portrayed in a fictional work (ie, at 5:05 in the morning…)

conflict
a struggle between two opposing forces, usually good and evil

convention
a standard way of presenting or expressing something

tragedy
a literary genre in which a character is brought to a disastrous end in his confrontation with another force, usually a villian

comedy
a dramatic genre of literature intended to entertain and amuse an audience

character
an imaginary personage who acts, appears, or is referred to in a literary work

villain
a character that opposes the hero, and is not only the antagonist, but especially evil

charaterization
the representation of a fictional personage or character

antihero
a protagonist who is one way or another the very opposite of a hero

hero
(if feminine; heroine) a character, often the main, who is usually larger than life and sometimes godlike

symbol
a person, place, thing, or event that figuratively represents or stands for something else

allegory
an extended association throughout an entire work between two levels of meaning, usually literal and abstract.

(ie, Animal Farm)

figurative language
also figure of speech, a word or phrase that evokes in the mind of a reader an obvious change in the usual meaning

imagery
any sensory detail in a work using figurative language to evoke a feeling/describe an object, etc

rhetoric
Greek for “orator,” describes the principles governing the art of writing

allusion
a reference, usually brief, to another text or entity external to the work

irony
a meaning or outcome contrary to what is expected

metaphor
a representation of one thing as if it was something else (comparing one thing to another)

metonymy
using the name of one thing to refer to another thing associated with it (ie, red tape for government work)

oxymoron
a combination of contradictory or opposite ideas, qualities, or entities (ie, an honest fool)

personification
attributing human qualities to objects or animals

simile
a representation of one thing as it were something else, using “like” or “as” (ie, that Starbucks cappuccino was like, so good I can’t even)

synecdoche
(syn·ec·do·che) a form of name substitution in which the part represents the whole (ie, a sail refers to a ship)

oeuve
an author’s entire body of work

hyperbole
purposeful exaggeration for effect (ie, hyperbole and a half)

understatement
opposite of hyperbole, also called litotes, makes its point by downplaying its real emphasis

sequence
a particular order in which related events, movements, or things follow each other

epic
a long narrative poem that records the adventures of a hero

novella
fiction longer than a short story, but shorter than a novel

foil
a character that serves as a contract to another

psychological realism
branch of realism that focuses on the interior life of characters

unreliable narriator
narrator that provides information that can’t be trusted in some way

gothic literature
particular atmosphere where setting is important (ie, strong feelings, horror, madness, secrets, spooky houses, etc)

southern gothic
form of gothic literature where typical Southern tropes are subverted (sneaky cheating drunk instead of honest Southern gentleman)

Choose your subject

x

Hi!
I'm Jessica!

Don't know how to start your paper? Worry no more! Get professional writing assistance from me.

Click here