Through by 56 percent of citizens and 25

Topic: EconomicsMacroeconomics
Sample donated:
Last updated: August 20, 2019

Through the decades the decline of local newspapers was significant. However local daily newspapers played a vital role during the interwar period. Working-class men gained information about domestic affairs and news. What is more, they could also read about international cases which were incorporated into morning and evening issues.

The decline of the local newspaper was noticed in the post-war period. (from 108 in 1948 to 85 in 1995) Some factors might be mentioned as the reason for its general decrease. First of all free newspapers, which were based upon non-journalistic sources and advertising revenues instead depending on copy sales. The next one is the competition between local paid-for newspapers and open issues to find similar cost-cutting strategies.

Don't use plagiarized sources.
Get Your Custom Essay on "Through by 56 percent of citizens and 25..."
For You For Only $13.90/page!


Get custom paper

The third reason is the technological development which overtaken work of editorial staff. Another aspect of local press declination was a gradually dropping amount of readership and advertisers. The last one is inclusion of local newspapers into large conglomerates (Franklin, B.

and Murphy, D. (1997) ‘The Local Rag in Tatters? The Decline of Britain’s Local Newspapers’ in Bromley, M. and O’Malley, T. (eds.) A Journalism Reader London: Routledge: pp.214;216).However, studies in Leicester showed that local newspapers were spreading further than tabloid ones, which couldn’t embrace local population.

Moreover, it was visible in figures, which revealed that the Sun was read by 56 percent of citizens and 25 percent of them read Mirror, while 83 percent of population Leicester Mercury. In 1977 Royal Commission on the Press was concerned about dwindling of local newspapers, so they decided to make a survey, ‘Attitudes to Press’ in which they asked people to rank their titles preferences that might be but on the local paper coverage. The score revealed that newspapers’ readership is most interested in reading TV or Radio programs. However, people did not find other media as the relevant source of information or entertainment.

Dissemination and development of Television caused local newspapers decline (Franklin, B., and Murphy, D. (1997) ‘The local rag in tatters? The decline of Britain’s local papers’ in Bromley, M. & O’Malley, T. (eds.) A Journalism Reader London: Routledge: pp.

215).In 1960s free newspapers distribution developed.  They depended only on advertising revenue rather than on circulation. The reason for that was the fact that people might read it or not because they were delivered into their houses as free sheets through letterboxes. In contrary to paid-for ones which income based on sales and advertising revenues. Despite this fact, they were three times more ‘cost-efficient’ than regular paid-for ones. The interesting fact is that in Scotland rather than in the UK local paid- for newspapers were read more often.

All these aspects caused very unpleasant welcome from local publishing entertainment. The situation changed in the 1980s when Thomson Regional Newspapers (TRN) and Reed Regional Newspapers (RRN) decided not to try to beat free newspapers but rather buy them. They produced some of them on their own and did not perceive free newspapers as opponents but as an integral part of this business (McNair, B.

(2003) ‘The Regional Story’ News and Journalism in the UK’ 4th ed. London: Routledge: pp. 209-211).Another problem is that journalists from local newspapers were becoming substituted by freelancers from free sheets. Circulation of newspapers and the type of them, if they were weekly or daily influenced journalists’ wages. Lots of young journalists did not go to any schools to learn their craft, but they had the opportunity to practice their skills in National Council for the Journalists (NCTJ), later on in local newspapers and were getting promoted further. The last step of this ladder for them was Fleet Street newsrooms. There were many disproportions between male and female journalists.

Men were mainly journalists in local and national newspapers while women were responsible only for female issues and children games (Franklin, B. and Murphy, D. (eds) (1998) ‘Local newspapers, technology and markets’ Making the Local News: Local Journalism in Context, London: Routledge, pp. 8-9).New technologies introduced in 1980s extended color printing style, but also ‘editionising’ skills were developed. These abilities make newspapers fit exactly for appropriate distinct of its distribution. Following that journalists’ capabilities must have been reinforced.

They were not only reporters, however, were converting into subeditors of newspapers. The investment into ‘editorial quality’ caused that gradually growing salaries for regional newspapers seduced better and more qualified journalists. Regional journalists earned significantly less money than Fleet-street ones (Franklin, B., and Murphy, D. (1997) ‘The Local Rag in Tatters? The Decline of Britain’s Local Newspapers’ in Bromley, M.

and O’Malley, T. (eds.) A Journalism Reader London: Routledge: pp. 218-219).

An exciting fact’s that in Scotland, as I mentioned before, more people were reading local newspapers, going that way it showed that provincial journalists earnings were more prominent than in the United Kingdom. Looking through the figures, we can see that 62.5 percent of adult population read local newspapers in Scotland while only 48.7 percent in the UK. 1988 was a year when Henley Centre for Economic Forecasting insisted by the Newspaper Society to convince regional newspapers that tabloidization of their papers might be very profitable (McNair, B.

(2003) ‘The Regional Story’ News and Journalism in the UK’ 4th ed. London: Routledge: pp. 213).’Dumbing down’ of readership process was steady and quickly disseminating. So newspapers must have included into their issues more eye-catching news, some affairs, and rumors. People were not reading newspapers to get essential news about the world but were looking for insignificant information about their idols’ lives or were encouraged by some sensational accident.

That combination of entertainment, news, gossips, and advertisements caused that tabloid format of newspapers found out to be most money-making one. Tabloids format facilitated readership’s comprehension of given news. The information they included were briefer, surrounded by bigger and more pictures than in typical newspapers. It was much more comfortable to hold in buses or any other public transport. They contained twice as many pages compare to regular newspapers. However „less than a dozen of the seventy-two local evening papers still publish the broadsheet format, and almost half of these operate as a tabloid on Saturdays; only one of the Sunday regional and Scottish titles is broadsheet”. (Franklin, B.

, and Murphy, D. (eds) (1998) ‘Local newspapers, technology and markets’ Making the Local News: Local Journalism in Context, London: Routledge, pp.17-18). There are some examples which show that costumers’ content is the most important aspect for publishers. Thomson Regional Newspapers’ (TRN) Newcastle Chronicle decided to alter a story about the double murder in the city from the front page to news of price reduction drive at Tesco’s. Another ridiculous situation mentioned in the Scotsman Edinburgh’s newspaper taken over by TRN. Two pages were describing a story about a toy that was almost unreachable by parents in the UK. The conclusion is that the times have changed and readership was interested in some other case than they were before (Franklin, B.

, and Murphy, D. (1997) ‘The Local Rag in Tatters? The Decline of Britain’s Local Newspapers’ in Bromley, M. and O’Malley, T. (eds.) A Journalism Reader London: Routledge: pp.

225).We should be concerned about future of the local newspapers because according to the research I have done declining process of them were significant through the decades. Moreover, we can compare historical basis with much more current texts. I found articles from the Independent from 2014 and Press Gazette from 2017. The Independent article from 31 August 2014 underlined the constant decrease of local newspapers sell. This dramatic drop was especially remarkable in South Wales Argus when it suffered fell off 33.5 percent and Doncaster Star, which was trading only 1000 copies per day.

However, there’re some exceptions. One of them is undoubtedly Scotland`s Sunday Herald which circulation 1 percent reinforced and was having 10000 website followers. The other one example was London Evening Standard, which reached high 27.2 growth what resulted in 890,457 sold copies daily.

(Burrell, I. 2014. The dizzying decline of Britain’s local newspapers: do you want the bad news or the good news?. ONLINE Available at http://www.independent.

co.uk/news/media/press/the-dizzying-decline-of-britain-s-local-newspapers-do-you-want-the-bad-news-or-the-good-news-9702684.html. Accessed 11 January 2018). Nowadays as mentioned in Press Gazette article from 31 March 2017 many cities and towns in the UK have just one newspaper, while some regions and districts don’t have any, that influenced situation of professional local journalists in the UK. Since 2005 almost a half of journalists lost their jobs in last decade, and significant decline of about 200 newspapers titles noticed (Ponsford, D. (2017) The decline of local journalism is a far greater threat to media plurality than Rupert Murdoch. ONLINE Available at: http://www.

pressgazette.co.uk/the-decline-of-local-journalism-is-a-far-greater-threat-to-media-plurality-than-rupert-murdoch/. Accessed 11 January 2018).We could find some information about it in the Independent where presented that ‚digitalization’ process of the news caused that local newspapers journalists were anxious about their future position. Even though the income of online local newspapers grow, they should focus much more on looking for professional journalists (Burrell, I. 2014. The dizzying decline of Britain’s local newspapers: do you want the bad news, or the good news?.

ONLINE Available at http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/press/the-dizzying-decline-of-britain-s-local-newspapers-do-you-want-the-bad-news-or-the-good-news-9702684.html. Accessed 11 January 2018). Press Gazette added that currently the most beneficial and money making are clicks, which reflect that some titles are eye-catching or attention gaining to encourage people to click on them.

(Ponsford, D. (2017) The decline of local journalism is a far greater threat to media plurality than Rupert Murdoch. ONLINE Available at: http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/the-decline-of-local-journalism-is-a-far-greater-threat-to-media-plurality-than-rupert-murdoch/. Accessed 11 January 2018).Despite passing the time, the problem of local newspapers dying is still actual.

Many improvements and technological development affected their deterioration. As might be noticed Internet is overtaking local newspapers market quicker than ever before. After all research and looking through analyses in local newspapers and journalism will be become entirely useless.References:Franklin, B. and Murphy, D.

(1997) ‘The Local Rag in Tatters? The Decline of Britain’s Local Newspapers’ in Bromley, M., and O’Malley, T. (eds.

) A Journalism Reader London: RoutledgeMcNair, B. (2003) ‘The Regional Story’ News and Journalism in the UK’ 4th ed. London: RoutledgeFranklin, B. and Murphy, D. (eds) (1998) ‘Local newspapers, technology and markets’ Making the Local News: Local Journalism in Context, London: RoutledgeBurrell, I. (2014).

The dizzying decline of Britain’s local newspapers: do you want the bad news, or the good news?. ONLINE Available at http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/press/the-dizzying-decline-of-britain-s-local-newspapers-do-you-want-the-bad-news-or-the-good-news-9702684.

html. Accessed 11 January 2018.Ponsford, D. (2017) The decline of local journalism is a far greater threat to media plurality than Rupert Murdoch.  ONLINE  Available at:  http://www.pressgazette.

co.uk/the-decline-of-local-journalism-is-a-far-greater-threat-to-media-plurality-than-rupert-murdoch/. Accessed 11 January 2018..

Choose your subject

x

Hi!
I'm Jessica!

Don't know how to start your paper? Worry no more! Get professional writing assistance from me.

Click here