Use This One!!! AP Lit Practice Test Vocab

Topics: CultureTraditions

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Last updated: May 15, 2019

harrowing
extremely distressing, usually used about an experience”For one with acrophobia, driving along a mountain road can be a harrowing experience.”
harrowing

meticulous
Showing great attention to detail; very careful and precise”Hunter is very meticulous when taking tests.

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meticulous

cordiality
sincere affection and kindness : cordial regard”Hunter shows much cordiality to Rachel.”
cordiality

garish
excessively or disturbingly vivid (garish colors, garish imagery)”Rachel’s garish sweater astounded Hunter.”
Bohemian (as a style)
A person with artistic or literary interests who disregards conventional standards of behavior.”Hunter chose not to participate in the Bohemian lifestyle.”
anecdote
A short account of an interesting or humorous incident.”Hunter chuckled at Chris’ anecdote of his commute to school this morning.”
anecdote

malicious
Having the nature of or resulting from malice; deliberately harmful; spiteful”Hunter has a malicious attitude towards Chris’ musical preferences.”
self-important
Excessively high regard for one’s own importance or station; conceit.”Hunter’s self-importance exceeds that of other people.”
snobbery
Snobbish behavior or an instance of it”It pains Hunter to see other’s snobbery.”
snobbery

perilous
fraught with danger”Walking on a tightrope 3000 feet above ground is a perilous game” “Leaping face-first into an ocean when all you can really see is the rocky shoreline is not only perilous, but probably stupid, too.”
belittle
…, lessen the authority, dignity, or reputation of”The coach constantly cussed out and made fun of his players after losses to belittle them”
belittle

“jobber”
a person who works “by the job” – such as a plumber or chimney-sweeper; common usage in England/Britain.”We hired a drywall jobber to finish the wall in our garage.”
straitlaced or straight-laced
exaggeratedly proper; priggish; puritanical”My straight-laced college roommate surprised everyone by skipping three days of classes to attend a Backstreet Boys concert in Pennsylvania.”
stucco
a plaster now made mostly from Portland cement and sand and lime
stucco

sabotage
a deliberate act of destruction or disruption in which equipment is damaged, or a process is intentionally disrupted
sabotage

ichthyology
the branch of zoology that studies fishes
bosom-friend
a very close friend; a best friend; a friend one keeps close to one’s heart
bosom-friend

thatch-eaves
the part of a thatched roof (one made from interwoven fibers such as reeds) that overhangs the outer wall
kernel (plant part)
the inner, softer part of a seed or nut
kernel (plant part)

clammy
unpleasantly cool and humid
clammy

oft
many times at short intervals, an abbreviation of often

amid
in the middle ofThe dude above is in his store amid all the fishes!
granary
a storehouse for threshed grain or animal feed
granary

winnowing
the act of separating grain from chaff
furrow
a long shallow trench in the ground (especially one made by a plow)

fume
noun – a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas”She coughed as the poison in the fumes entered her lungs and began to devour her breath.”verb – be mad, angry, or furious (same image works!)”The protestors fumed when they were told to disperse and go back to their homes”

swath
the space created by the swing of a scythe or the cut of a mowing machine”The swaths in the lawn were spaced in a UFO sign through Johnny’s artistic mowing skills.”
bourn
a small stream or brook”The water in the bourn trickled down the rocks with barely a sound.”
bourn

twitter
a series of chirps”The ‘Chirping’ Crickets were famous for their high-pitched twitters in their songs.

twitter

fickle
marked by erratic changeableness in affections or attachments”As a result of her diagnosis of bi-polar disorder, her personality was a fickle friend.”
fickle

benevolent
having or showing or arising from a desire to promote the welfare or happiness of others”When the man listened to the Buddha’s teachings, he gained a benevolent insight and started a charity for kids the very next day.”
conspiring
plotting, agreeing in secret”The dishwashers met together in a dark alley, conspiring against the laundromat.”
pagan
one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods; heathen; an irreligious or hedonistic person; in ancient Rome, a follower of a polytheistic religion.”The pagan man could be seen on the streets where the evils of human nature inhabited.”
stifling
forceful prevention, characterized by oppressive heat and humidity”The tourists hid under their umbrellas to avoid the stifling heat.”
stifling

monotony
constancy of tone or pitch or inflection”The monotony of the professors voice made the students fall asleep.

monotony

rhyme scheme
the pattern of rhyme in a poem”The poem had no rhyme scheme.”
rhyme scheme

imperceptible
impossible or difficult to perceive by the mind or senses”The beauty of the plant was almost imperceptible.

imperceptible

diluting
weakening”Diluting the water will make it weaker.”
diluting

sardonic
disdainfully or ironically humorous”The graffiti on the store was sardonic.

sardonic

inharmonious
not in harmony”The music sounded good, unfortunately the choir was inharmonious.”
yearning
full of longing or unfulfilled desire”The flower was yearning for sunlight.”
yearning

muted
toned down or silenced, can be used of sound or of color”The trumpet was muted to give it a softer tone.”
muted

reaping
.

.., gathering, receiving something as a consequence of actions”If one were to host a benefit concert, the cause would be reaping the money or items raised – not the host.”

surcease
…, to end”If the world were to surcease tomorrow, one might spend his last day doing whatever he pleases.”
surcease

atonement
.

.., compensation for a wrong”Jesus Christ’s blood is an atonement for our sins.

atonement

parody
..

., humorous or satirical mimicry”Weird Al specializes in parody when it comes to his remake of popular songs.”

parody

personification

, A figure of speech in which an object or animal is given human feelings, thoughts, or attitudes”Disney uses personification in cartoon movies to give the animals life-like qualities.

personification

allegory
.

.., A literary work in which characters, objects, or actions represent abstractions”Many authors use allegory to make something interesting without saying what the object is directly.”

allusion
., a reference to another work of literature, person, or event.”Shakespeare made allusions to the bible in his works.”
allusion

nostalgia
a longing for the past
discredit
the state of being held in low esteem; to strip an authority of the power of authority by calling into doubt the veracity of its claims

mournful
…, filled with or evoking sadness
mournful

elegy
..

., a mournful poem

elegy

ravaged
made uninhabitable; having been robbed and destroyed by force and violence
ravaged

catalog
a complete list of things
catalog

remote
far distant in space, inaccessible and sparsely populated
tactful
showing skill and sensitivity in dealing with people

French bisque
a French highly seasoned and creamy soup, often made from a coulis of seafood, such as lobster
French bisque

nebulous
lacking definition or definite content, can be used about an image, an idea, etc.
nebulous

poised
in full control of your faculties, marked by balance or equilibrium and readiness for action
spellbound
…, having your attention fixated as though by a spell
reconcile
…, bring into consonance or accord
enthralled
…, filled with wonder and delight
enthralled

eccentric
..

., a person with an unusual or odd personality

eccentric

intrigue (noun)

, A secret plot or scheme.

intrigues (verb)

to arouse the curiosity or interest of by unusual, new, or fascinating or compelling qualities; captivate. As a car fanatic, how engines work are greatly intriguing to me.

opulence
…, extreme wealth; luxuriousness; abundance. Beverly Hills is a neighborhood of great opulence.

opulence

disdain
…, lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike. Michigan and Ohio State fans disdain one another.
explicate
…, to make plain or clear, explain; to interpret. A complex or confusing essay may need to be explicated to be understood.

explicate

syntax
…, the grammatical arrangement of words in sentences. Before she took AP Lang, her syntax in her essays was confusing.

syntax

euphemism
.

.., a mild, indirect, or vague term substituting for a harsh, blunt, or offensive term.

We have to go to a funeral, Grandma kicked the bucket.

euphemism

apostrophe
…, address to an absent or imaginary person.

The playwright used apostrophe to share the character’s inner thoughts about his friend.

oxymoron
…, a figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms.

Just be yourself, act naturally. Jumbo Shrimp.

oxymoron

hyperbole

, a figure of speech that uses exaggeration to express strong emotion, make a point, or evoke humor

hyperbole

introspection
.

.., the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conduct

introspection

longing
prolonged unfulfilled desire or need
repressed
…, characterized by or showing the suppression of impulses or emotions
repressed

sublime
inspiring awe, worthy of adoration or reverence
scuffed
scrape or brush the surface of (a shoe or other object) against something
scuffed

sestina
a lyric form that consists of six stanzas of six lines each followed by a three-line conclusion or envoy; this form requires a strict pattern of repetition of six key words that end the lines of the first stanza

English Sonnet
Also known as the Shakespearean Sonnet, it consists of three quatrains with the rhyme pattern “abab,” cdcd,” “efef” followed by a couplet with the pattern “gg,” each line is iambic pentameter; often the last six lines resolve a problem or answer a question posed in the first eight
Petrarchan Sonnet
Also known as an Italian Sonnet, it consists of an octave with the rhyme pattern abbaabba, followed by a sestet with the rhyme pattern cdecde or cdcdcd, often the last six lines resolve a problem or answer a question posed in the first eight
Petrarchan Sonnet

ode
.

.., a poem usually addressed to a particular person, object or event that has stimulated deep and noble feelings in the poet

ode

ballad
.

.., a type of poem that is meant to be sung and is both lyric and narrative in nature

ballad

contemplative
..

., studying, thinking, reflecting on an issue

contemplative

understated

, presented or expressed in a subtle and effective way

understated

laudatory
.

.., full of or giving praise

ironic
…, characterized by often poignant difference or incongruity between what is expected and what actually is
ironic

superficial
..

., being or affecting or concerned with a surface. A superficial person is concerned with looks.

superficial

evenhanded
…, without bias. Someone who is even handed has a balanced view
surreptitious
…, conducted with or marked by hidden aims or methods. Someone who is surreptitious does things for the benefit of themselves not others.

painstaking
…, characterized by extreme care and great effortTaking a long test can be painstaking
painstaking

transgression
the action of going beyond or overstepping some boundary or limit
base motives
the underlying reason that determines a person’s behavior; the animalistic foundation for behavior

endeavor
earnest and conscientious activity intended to do or accomplish something
endeavor

allege

, report or maintain. Someone must allege the road

profundity
intellectual depth, great depth of intellect, feeling, or meaning

tribulation
an annoying or frustrating or catastrophic event
tribulation

mar
..

., a mark or flaw that spoils the appearance of something (especially on a person’s body); to damage, especially in a disfiguring way

alliteration
…, use of the same consonant at the beginning of each stressed syllable in a line of verse

assonance
..

., the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words

consonance

, the repetition of consonants (or consonant patterns) especially at the ends of words

internal rhyme
…, when two words in the same line rhyme

iambic meter
..

., an iambic foot, which consists of one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable

unbridled
…, not restrained or controlledThe women had unbridled grief when she learned of her father’s sudden death.

unbridled

skepticism
doubt about the truth of something, a doubting or questioning attitudeThe children began think with skepticism about Santa Claus.
skepticism

admonition
..

., , cautionary advice about something imminent (especially imminent danger)He sought admonishing therapy.

admonition

eulogy
a formal expression of praise, a formal speech praising a person who has diedWriting an eulogy for my mother’s funeral was the hardest speech I have ever had to write.
parable
…, a short moral story (often with animal characters)”Jesus told many parables through out his life in order to instruct the people about morals and values.

parable

reminiscence
…, the process of remembering (especially the process of recovering information by mental effort) We look through our scrapbook as a way to reminiscence on old memories.
raconteur
a person skilled in telling witty, entertaining anecdotesJane is a brilliant raconteur with a bight future ahead of her.
raconteur

sanctimonious

, excessively or hypocritically piousI would be more open to your beliefs, if you weren’t so sanctimonious.

sanctimonious

moralize
…, speak as if delivering a sermon
moralize

advocate
a person who pleads for a cause or propounds an idea; speak, plead, or argue in favour of

satirist
…, a humorist who uses ridicule and irony and sarcasm
satirist

dismal
depressing in character or appearance

lamenting
…, vocally expressing grief or sorrow or resembling such expression

rebuff
a deliberate discourteous act (usually as an expression of anger or disapproval); reject outright and bluntly
rebuff

broach
…, (v.) to bring up or begin to talk about (a subject); to announce, introduce; to break the surface of the water; to pierce; (n.) a spit for roasting; a tool for tapping casks
broach

sly
marked by skill in deception, especially if very clever
sly

understatement
a statement that is restrained in ironic contrast to what might have been said”It’s an understatement to say that someone that got 100% on a test did okay.”
understatement

invocation
the act of appealing for help, usually at the beginning of a religious ritual”The worship service began with an invocation to bring reassurance to those who were suffering.”
invocation

aside
a line spoken by an actor to the audience but not intended for others on the stage”The playwright wrote an aside, spoken by the protagonist to let the audience in on a secret that none of the other characters could know about.”
aside

paucity
an insufficient quantity or number”We could not confirm nor deny the hypothesis due to the paucity of the data.”
paucity

veracity
conformity to the facts, accurate; unwillingness to tell lies”To check the veracity of this essay, double check all of the cited sources.”, unwillingness to tell lies
veracity

counterintuitive
contrary to what common sense would suggest”The fact that the earth is round seems very counterintuitive because it seems like it would be flat.”
counterintuitive

precedent
…, an example that is used to justify similar occurrences at a later time”In court cases, lawyers usually try to find precedents set in previous cases that will favor their clients.”
precedent

assertion
…, a declaration that is made emphatically (as if no supporting evidence were necessary)”People that are said to be illegal residents of the U.S. can’t be deported unless the government finds evidence supporting the assertion.”
assertion

recluse
…, one who lives in solitude

thwarted
disappointingly unsuccessful, blocked, prevented
thwarted

wayfarer
…, walks from place to place, traveler; especially one who travels on foot
wayfarer

tyrant
…, any person who exercises power in a cruel way
tyrant

abject
…, most unfortunate or miserable

wry
…, humorously sarcastic or mocking

aversion
…, a feeling of intense dislike

stern
1) the rear part of a ship (true, but not on test)2) severe and unremitting in making demands (on test)
stern

admonition
a strong warning or reprimand”Do I really need to repeat my admonition to avoid the R.O.U.S.-es, the flame spurts, and the lightning sand?”
admonition

Gothic
18th Century: a combination of both horror and Romantic literary traditions; settings include dark moors, haunted castles, gargoyles, foggy marshes, mad scientists, and melodramatic plotlines; Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) is an example of the Romantic Gothic novel; Edgar Allan Poe’s mid-19th century Victorian Gothic tales arrived after the Gothic novel had fallen out of favor with the elite in England; Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818) is the most well known satire of the Gothic novel, or mock-gothic.
Gothic

Pastoral
A mode of literature rather than a genre; the pastoral explores the life of the everyday rural experience, esp. that of the sherpherd; the shepherd is often a Christ figure, guarding the flock; Classical pastorals, such as Hesiod’s “Works and Days,” demonstrates people in harmony with nature, such as in Eden, (and includes a shepherd); other pastorals are meant to suggest an alternative to urban life (and usually include a shepherd).
Pastoral

Surrealism
Surrealism is a style and a movement; it presents the absurd as representative, unexpected juxtapositions as logical truths, and relies heavily on non sequitur (a comment so meaningless to what follows that it is comical); “How many surrealists does it take to change a light bulb? Banana.” The above surrealist painting by Salvador Dali is called “The Persistence of Memory.”
Surrealism

Naturalism
A literary school of thought that thrived from around 1840 to 1940s; the assumption is that human behavior is affected by heredity, the environment, and social forces; Naturalism rose in opposition to Romanticism, which stressed the ability of individuals to determine one’s own fate. Darwin’s “Origins of Species” was very influenctial. Where Romanticism is highly symbolic, Naturalism is literal, and where Romanticism explores magic, monsters, and all things Gothic, Naturalism dealt with the everyday as worthy of its own literature. “Stephen Crane’s “The Red Badge of Courage” is an example of naturalism”
Naturalism

Classicism
A mode of literature in which the work demonstrates a clear admiration for the ancient Greek and Roman models of literature and seeks to emulate their forms; Classicism is found in literature, architecture, music, drama, dance, etc. “The dome, pillars, and frieze found in the U.S. Capitol building are all representative of Classicism expressed in architecture.”
Classicism

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